Moya Bailey

Thrown away where? The world is round.*

Author: moyabailey (page 1 of 6)

A radical reckoning: a Black woman’s racial revenge in Black Mirror’s “Black Museum”

So geeked for this piece to have found a home at Feminist Media Studies! Special thanks to Erica Edwards for the invitation to Rutgers that really set this piece in motion!

An excerpt below…

Image of Letitia Wright as Nish in the Black Mirror Episode “Black Museum.”

“Black Museum,” the final installment of season four of the original series Black Mirror, incorporates many of the episodes that have come before it, creating an apotheosis episode that critiques the technophilia of the series. A Black woman administers justice and brings forth a rare, onscreen vision of a white man being held accountable for his racist violence. Told in three parts, with sci-fi elements that are reminiscent of the work of afrofuturist visionary Octavia Butler and borrow directly from famed illusionist Penn Jillette, “Black Museum” offers a welcome departure from the standard Hollywood tropes of magical negroes, white saviors, and Black victimhood. This British production and cast make the redress narrative possible, building on another yet unsubverted trope of Black British actors portraying Black Americans. It inspires viewers to consider the role of the museum, an institution that has long served as a compendium of technology and racialized gendered violence.

#HashtagActivism is out…everywhere!

Brooke Foucault Welles and Sarah J. Jackson look on as I talk into the mic at our book tour launch at the Strand Bookstore in New York City.
Brooke Foucault Welles and Sarah J. Jackson look on as I talk into the mic at our book tour launch at the Strand Bookstore in New York City. Photo by @MLMillerPhD

I really can’t express my delight in my first (co-authored) book, #HashtagActivism: Networks of Race and Gender Justice, being out in the world! My amazing co-authors Sarah J. Jackson and Brooke Foucault Welles and I had a wonderful crowd at The Strand Bookstore in New York City, the first stop on our book tour. Folks asked us great questions and my cousin Jonathan came!

We have been very lucky to have excerpts appear in our favorite feminist publications including Ms. Magazine and Bitch Media. We also made it on the Ms. March 2020 Reads for the Rest of Us as well as Autostraddle’s Also Also Also. Our chapter on allyship and the hashtag #CrimingWhileWhite was featured on Engadget. I got to speak with Gracie Staples at the Atlanta Journal Constitution about the book who interviewed me 16+ years earlier about my involvement in the Nelly Protest. I wonder what our actions could have sparked if we had had hashtags to support our organizing?!

The book is just $20 so do take a look to learn more about how folks are using hashtag activism to change the world! Also, come see us in a city near you!

Misogynoir in the Media

Misogynoir is popping up in the media and I am going to do a better keeping track. Here are two places I and the word have shown up.

Dictionary.com features “misogynoir” as a word made by a woman for Women’s History Month.

Spring Talks

Dr, Moya Bailey Northeastern University 

February 5th, 2020 @ 5:30PM
"Misogynoir in Medicine"
The University of Kansas
The Hall Center for the Humanities, Conference Hall

March 3rd, 2020 @ 3:30PM
"Debility and Disability in Digital Activism"
Fitchburg State University
Randall Science Lecture Hall

April 20th-30th, 2020
"Humans in the Digital Supply Chain"
University of Illinois, Chicago

Conference: Resources and Visibility in Digital Humanities at UIC
April 2nd, 2020 @ 5:00PM

Tuesday March 3rd @ 7:30PM
The STRAND
New York, New York

Thursday, April 9th @ 7:00PM
Harvard Book Store
Cambridge, MA

Friday, April 24th @ 7:30PM
Charis Books
Decatur, GA

Real Gs Move in Silence

Queer and allied students of Spelman College at the March for Women’s Lives in 2004.

The “Notorious BGS” strikes again. While the rest of us were wringing our hands about the latest far right homophobic attack, Beverly Guy-Sheftall has been quietly working to build institutions that will support us beyond reaction. I pride myself on staying up to date on the happenings of my alma mater but when my Spelman sister Ruha Benjamin forwarded me THE announcement I was shocked! Not only was I shocked by the incredible news, I was shocked to find that I was sitting in the same room with two of the people who made it possible at the moment it was announced, Evelynn Hammonds and of course Beverly Guy-Sheftall.

The news of course is that Jon Stryker of the Arcus Foundation has gifted Spelman College with a $2 Million matching grant to establish the Audre Lorde Queer Studies Endowed Chair, the first of its kind at any HBCU.

The significance of this gift cannot be understated. By establishing an endowed chair, the person hired for this position is freed from the institutional bureaucracy that is often used to silence progressive and radical thought. The person in this position will be free to develop curriculum, programs, and events that support Spelman College and other HBCUs in the vitally important work of gender and sexuality justice. 

HBCUs have long been leaders in fomenting racial justice minded graduates but this position has the ability to build on the incredible work that the Women’s Research and Resource Center (WRRC) is already doing to equip these same graduates with a liberatory framework around gender and sexuality. It was less than 15 years ago that the first queer theory course was taught at Spelman or at any HBCU, by alumna Layli Mapayan, and just last year that the WRRC announced the development of a Gender and Sexuality Institute. BGS has been busy.

When folks ask, what’s next after marriage equality, I hope they will look to Jon Stryker’s gift as a possibility model. This is what solidarity looks like and this is what it looks like to use your privilege in the service of others. It’s clear that ally is measured not in word but deed. I couldn’t be prouder of my Spelman sisters Beverly and Evelynn’s radical commitments to Spelman College.

SGL Presents Drs. Sari van Anders and Moya Bailey on Caster Semenya

I did this video a while ago! Glad to see it in the world. Sending lots of love to @caster800m

Women Tweet on Violence: From #YesAllWomen to #MeToo

Sarah J. Jackson, Brooke Foucault Welles and I wrote a book!!! Here’s an article based on one of our chapters. I can’t wait for the book to be in the world!

From the earliest feminist press to Twitter, women have used technology to create and sustain narratives that demand attention and redress for gendered violence. Herein we argue that the #MeToo boom was made possible by the digital labor, consciousness-raising, and alternative storytelling created through the #YesAllWomen, #SurvivorPrivilege, #WhyIStayed, and #TheEmptyChair hashtag networks. Each of these hashtags highlight women’s experiences with interpersonal and institutionally-enabled violence and each was precipitated by high-profile news events. Alongside an examination of Twitter networks, we consider the social and cultural conditions that made each hashtag significant at particular moments, examining the ideological and political work members of these hashtag networks perform. We find that feminist hashtags have been successful in creating an easy-to-digest shorthand that challenges and changes mainstream narratives about violence and victimhood.

Read more here

A Mandate for More: On Unapologetic

I had the opportunity to read Charlene Carruthers book Unapologetic: A Black, Queer, and Feminist Mandate for Radical Movements. Here’s a short excerpt of my Short Take.

Carruthers also challenges millennials’ and Generation Z’s affinities for social media, arguing that while it is potentially a useful tool, it can be distracting and take organizers away from building the relationships required for sustained struggle. She even draws a comparison between some of the FBI’s COINTELPRO tactics and the contemporary use of backchannels and BuzzFeed to spread rumors that promote organizational infighting. Carruthers cautions us to try to do the hard work of nurturing accountability offline in ways that don’t disrupt our organizing. 

Read more here

I had some thoughts about music, misogynoir, and masculinity and it’s up at Bitch Media.

Survivors of R. Kelly’s abuse

Surviving R. Kelly unironically tracks the maturation of a predator who learned from his 2008 trial that it’s better to harm girls and women who are just north of 18 because slightly older women don’t garner police interest. Rather than understanding his behavior as predatory and abusive, a punitive justice system taught him to minimize his legal culpability and helped him adapt his behavior and refine his rapacity, becoming more controlling of the women in his life as public scrutiny intensified.

Read more here

“‘Misogynoir’ Coiner Moya Bailey Is Eating Pasta and Channeling Her Inner Black Auntie”

When doing an interview is an absolute joy and the title just fully sums up the way I live my life.

Dr. Moya Bailey believes that good things come from connecting and organizing. After seeing how Black women were stereotyped and miscategorized in medical yearbooks while working on her graduate school dissertation in 2010, Bailey coined the term “misogynoir” (a portmanteau of “misogyny” and the French word for “black”) to describe how Black women are viewed and treated in society vis-à-vis their race and their gender. “It was about creating clarity. Once you’re able to name your oppression, I think you’re better able to address it,” she says.

Read the full interview here.

« Older posts

© 2020 Moya Bailey

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑