Moya Bailey

Thrown away where? The world is round.*

Tag: misogynoir

A radical reckoning: a Black woman’s racial revenge in Black Mirror’s “Black Museum”

So geeked for this piece to have found a home at Feminist Media Studies! Special thanks to Erica Edwards for the invitation to Rutgers that really set this piece in motion!

An excerpt below…

Image of Letitia Wright as Nish in the Black Mirror Episode “Black Museum.”

“Black Museum,” the final installment of season four of the original series Black Mirror, incorporates many of the episodes that have come before it, creating an apotheosis episode that critiques the technophilia of the series. A Black woman administers justice and brings forth a rare, onscreen vision of a white man being held accountable for his racist violence. Told in three parts, with sci-fi elements that are reminiscent of the work of afrofuturist visionary Octavia Butler and borrow directly from famed illusionist Penn Jillette, “Black Museum” offers a welcome departure from the standard Hollywood tropes of magical negroes, white saviors, and Black victimhood. This British production and cast make the redress narrative possible, building on another yet unsubverted trope of Black British actors portraying Black Americans. It inspires viewers to consider the role of the museum, an institution that has long served as a compendium of technology and racialized gendered violence.

From Anita Hill to Christine Blasey Ford, what’s changed?

 I was on Seattle’s NPR Station talking about  what has and hasn’t changed since Anita Hill’s testimony 27 years ago. You can listen here.

 

 

On misogynoir: citation, erasure, and plagiarism

This piece has been years in the making! So grateful for you @thetrudz!

We, Moya Bailey and Trudy aka @thetrudz, had significant roles in the creation and proliferation of the term misogynoir. Misogynoir describes the anti-Black racist misogyny that Black women experience. Despite coining the term in 2008 and writing about the term online since 2010, we experience, to varying degrees, our contributions being erased, our writing not cited, or our words plagiarized by people who find the word compelling. It

 is not surprising that misogynoir would be enacted against the Black women who brought the word to public acclaim but it is nonetheless troubling. This is not to say that every time the word is used, our names need to be mentioned, but it does matter that our intellectual interventions are understood in proper context. In

this article, we interview each other and discuss the ramifications of the naming of misogynoir in digital media and its impact on our own lives.

Read the full piece here.

 

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